UK Unveils Plan To Become First G7 Country To Go Net Zero By 2050: ’Now Is The Time’

UK Unveils Plan To Become First G7 Country To Go Net Zero By 2050: ’Now Is The Time’

Theresa May said her government would introduce legislation to amend the country’s 2008 climate change act and include the new midcentury target. The change will go before Parliament on Wednesday and, if enacted, would make the U.K. the first G7 country to take such a step.’ data-reactid=”6″>Prime Minister Theresa May said her government would introduce legislation to amend the country’s 2008 climate change act and include the new midcentury target. The change will go before Parliament on Wednesday and, if enacted, would make the U.K. the first G7 country to take such a step.

“Now is the time to go further and faster to safeguard the environment for our children. This country led the world in innovation during the Industrial Revolution, and now we must lead the world to a cleaner, greener form of growth,” May said in a statement. “Standing by is not an option. Reaching net zero by 2050 is an ambitious target, but it is crucial that we achieve it to ensure we protect our planet for future generations.”

still far off-track from meeting those goals. President Donald Trump said the United States would withdraw itself from the accord shortly after he was elected, and scientists have since issued warnings that emissions are accelerating at a breakneck pace.’ data-reactid=”9″>Even with the lower Paris targets, the world is still far off-track from meeting those goals. President Donald Trump said the United States would withdraw itself from the accord shortly after he was elected, and scientists have since issued warnings that emissions are accelerating at a breakneck pace.

“Standing by is not an option,” May said late Tuesday. “Reaching net zero by 2050 is an ambitious target, but it is crucial that we achieve it to ensure we protect our planet for future generations.” (Photo: Frank Augstein/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

amounted to a “loophole” that would shift the burden of full adaptation in part to developing nations.’ data-reactid=”23″>Environmental groups have expressed some disappointment with May’s plan, which would allow the U.K. to purchase international carbon credits. Doug Parr, chief scientists for Greenpeace UK, told The Guardian the provision amounted to a “loophole” that would shift the burden of full adaptation in part to developing nations.

“This type of offsetting has a history of failure and is not, according to the government’s climate advisers, cost-efficient,” Parr told The Guardian.

announced her resignation as the Conservative Party leader last month, stepping down on June 7 and remaining in power as a lame-duck prime minister until her replacement is chosen. She had struggled to steer the U.K. through the process of leaving the European Union (termed Brexit) but said at the time that she had done her “best” while leading the country.’ data-reactid=”29″>May announced her resignation as the Conservative Party leader last month, stepping down on June 7 and remaining in power as a lame-duck prime minister until her replacement is chosen. She had struggled to steer the U.K. through the process of leaving the European Union (termed Brexit) but said at the time that she had done her “best” while leading the country.

“I feel as certain today as I did three years ago that in a democracy, if you give people a choice, you have a duty to implement what they decide. I have done my best to do that,” May said while announcing her resignation. “I have done everything I can to convince MPs to back that [Brexit] deal. Sadly, I have not been able to do so.”

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.‘ data-reactid=”32″>This article originally appeared on HuffPost.