What happens to your body when daylight saving time ends? Experts explain

What happens to your body when daylight saving time ends? Experts explain

Daylight saving time ends on Nov. 3. Here are some of the surprising effects it can have on our health. (Photo: Getty Images)

It’s that time of year again. On Sunday, Nov. 3 at 2 a.m., daylight saving time ends and we set our clocks back an hour.

stroke, according to a 2016 Finnish study. Ischemic stroke, which is the most common type of stroke, is caused by a clot blocking blood flow to the brain, according to the American Academy of Neurology.’ data-reactid=”25″>Like many people, our bodies don’t like change. Simply moving the clock back or ahead one hour temporarily increases the risk of ischemic stroke, according to a 2016 Finnish study. Ischemic stroke, which is the most common type of stroke, is caused by a clot blocking blood flow to the brain, according to the American Academy of Neurology.

During the first two days after a daylight saving transition, the researchers found that the overall rate of ischemic stroke went up by 8 percent. This risk was particularly high for people over age 65, whose risk of stroke went up by 20 percent after the time change.The good news: The rates returned to normal after two days.

BMJ showed a 24-percent jump in heart attack risk the Monday after daylight saving time kicked off, but the same study found that heart attack risk dropped 21 percent on the Tuesday after returning to standard time in the fall, possibly because people got an additional hour of sleep.’ data-reactid=”30″>That 60-minute time change has a big impact on your heart health. While the risk of having a heart attack goes up when daylight saving starts in the spring, it actually goes down when the time change ends in the fall. A study published in the journal BMJ showed a 24-percent jump in heart attack risk the Monday after daylight saving time kicked off, but the same study found that heart attack risk dropped 21 percent on the Tuesday after returning to standard time in the fall, possibly because people got an additional hour of sleep.

Natalie D. Dautovich, PhD, an assistant professor at Virginia Commonwealth University and an environmental scholar at the National Sleep Foundation, tells Yahoo Lifestyle: “A change in the timing of our sleep, even by just an hour, can result in feelings of ‘jet lag’ until we adjust to the new change. As a result, you may feel sluggish, sleepy during the day, and have difficulty concentrating while adjusting to the change.”’ data-reactid=”34″>Although you’re technically getting an hour back, Natalie D. Dautovich, PhD, an assistant professor at Virginia Commonwealth University and an environmental scholar at the National Sleep Foundation, tells Yahoo Lifestyle: “A change in the timing of our sleep, even by just an hour, can result in feelings of ‘jet lag’ until we adjust to the new change. As a result, you may feel sluggish, sleepy during the day, and have difficulty concentrating while adjusting to the change.”

But there is some good news: “A benefit of the time change in the fall is earlier exposure to daylight, which can help to synchronize circadian rhythms to the new time,” Dautovich says.

Søren D. Østergaard, MD, PhD, one of the study’s researchers and an associate professor at Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark, told ScienceDaily.’ data-reactid=”40″>”We expect that the entire spectrum of severity is affected by the transition from daylight saving time to standard time,” Søren D. Østergaard, MD, PhD, one of the study’s researchers and an associate professor at Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark, told ScienceDaily.

Østergaard added: “Furthermore, the transition to standard time is likely to be associated with a negative psychological effect as it very clearly marks the coming of a period of long, dark and cold days.”

Not a fan of adjusting your clocks — and body — multiple times a year? You’re not alone. While Arizona and Hawaii are the only states that don’t observe daylight saving time, others are looking to follow suit.

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